Trump Supporters Removed From Another Internet Service

Right-wing media pundit Michelle Malkin is now fighting Airbnb after the company banned her from using their services and says their actions are in violation of American civil rights law.

“I have gotten feedback from very good lawyers who say that accommodation businesses in the state of California, where Airbnb is located, are under the Unruh Civil Rights Act–which prevents this very anti-free-speech and pro housing discrimination that this company has forced upon my family. A lot is at stake here, of course, and we have many legal grounds for action,” Malkin said.

Malkin made a crowdfunding account at fundly.com/michellefightsairbnb, where she raised more than $8,000 in her fight against the tech company’s hostile and discriminatory practices.

“I have raised money for other heroes and patriots over the past thirty years. Now, I am asking my readers for help in fighting my own battle – which is your battle too,” she said.

We have reported on other times when Airbnb has targeted conservative dissidents in their attempt to enforce the narrative and control minds:

“Lodging platform Airbnb is now permanently deleting users they think could be traveling to Charlottesville this Saturday to visit the Unite the Right rally.”

“The company is saying that by going to the right-wing rally, users are breaking their terms of service. In a comment given to Gizmodo, the company said they are deleting users they say are “antithetical to Airbnb’s Community Commitment.”

“The Airbnb Community Commitment is something that users are forced to accept in order to use the service and was created last year after a ton of complaints concerning racism by hosts. Gizmodo says this seems to be the first time the agreement was preemptively used to ban guests…”

While many conservatives are against the views of the speakers — Airbnb’s actions have kicked off an intense debate about when it is ok to refuse service to people. The left constantly wants private businesses to not have the right to refuse services based on the business owner’s religious beliefs, for example — making cakes for gay weddings — yet they also believe it is okay to refuse service if their political ideas are against their own.

Author: Scott Dowdy